(new) Hawaii Five-0 on CBS

the new Hawaii Five-0 on CBS


H50-902-002

“Ke kanaka i ha’ule mai ka lewa mai” – When a vacationing dad on a flight to Honolulu is kidnapped and force to parachute mid-flight, Danny, Tani and Junior track him through the jungle to discover that he may not be who he seems. Also, McGarrett is threatened with a secret from his past, on HAWAII FIVE-0, Friday, Oct. 5 (9:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

(“Ke kanaka i ha’ule mai ka lewa mai” is Hawaiian for “The Man Who Fell from the Sky”)

REGULAR CAST:
Alex O’Loughlin (Steve McGarrett)
Scott Caan (Danny “Danno” Williams)
Chi McBride (Lou Grover)
Jorge Garcia (Jerry Ortega)
Meaghan Rath (Tani Rey)
Beulah Koale (Junior Reigns)
Taylor Wily (Kamekona)
Kimee Balmilero (Noelani Cunha)

RECURRING CAST:
Rochelle Aytes (Agent Greer)
Jack Coleman (Agent Miller)

GUEST CAST:
Eric Steinberg (Captain Keo)
David Preston (Jack Teague)
Susan King (Holly Teague)
Kennedy King (Spencer Teague)
Conlan Casal (Man/Kidnapper)
Emi Sklar (Flight Attendant)
Vichen Jiang (Lead Merc)
Harrison Saito (Cadet Pearson)
Jiahndria Lozano-Day (Cadet Olina)
Kat Nakano (Passenger #1)
Anthony Johnson (Passenger #2)
Will Yeh (Guard)

WRITTEN BY: David Wolkove & Matt Wheeler
DIRECTED BY: Eagle Egilsson

More pictures HERE. Thanks to SpoilerTV.

Like this:

LikeLoading...

Related

Original Source


Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett

Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett

Adapted and updated from a 2013 post.

Fifty years ago this month, Hawaii Five-O debuted. While a cop show, it had an element of international intrigue from the start.

The two-hour television movie version version of the pilot, which first aired on CBS on SEPT. 20, 1968, concerned a plot where Red Chinese intelligence operative Wo Fat was torturing U.S. intelligence agents in the Pacific Rim and obtaining important information.

Steve McGarrett, the no-nonsense head of state police unit Hawaii Five-O is drawn to the case because the latest victim was a friend of his. The lawman, a former U.S. Naval intelligence officer, isn’t one to back down from official pressure to lay off.

The pilot immediately grabbed the attention of viewers. A short pre-titles sequence shows Wo Fat using a sensory deprivation chamber for the torture. That’s followed by a 90-second main title featuring a stirring theme by Morton Stevens.

The composer initially thought about re-using the theme he wrote for an unsold pilot, CALL TO DANGER. His wife, Annie Stevens, strongly advised against the move, according to a 2010 STORY IN THE HONOLULU STAR ADVERTISER. As a result, Stevens created one of the greatest themes in television history.

The series was conceived by veteran television producer Leonard Freeman, who wrote the pilot. Freeman’s 1967 first draft had a team led by McGarrett, with a mid-20s Hawaiian sidekick, Kono Kalakaua, a third, heavy-set detective and Chin Ho Kelly, who was the Honolulu Police Department’s liaison with Five-O. In the final version of the story, the sidekick became the Caucasian Danny Williams; the Kono name was given to the heavier-set character; and Chin Ho was made a full-fledged member of Five-O.

Freeman & Co. were preparing to film the pilot with American actor Robert Brown as McGarrett. Rose Freeman, widow of the Five-O creator, told a 1996 fan convention in Los Angeles that CBS objected to the casting and, just five days before filming was to start, Brown was replaced with Jack Lord, the first screen incarnation of Felix Leiter in Dr. No. Brown ended up starring in another 1968 series, Here Come the Brides.

Perry Lafferty, a former CBS executive, told the story a bit differently in an interview for the Archive of American Television. His version, though, still had Jack Lord as a last-minute casting.

The pilot had Tim O’Kelly as Danny. When the series was picked up, Freeman recast the part with James MacArthur, who a small, but notable role in Hang ‘Em High, a Clint Eastwood Western film that Freeman had produced.

The international espionage aspect of Five-O remained throughout the show’s 12-year run, though less so in the later seasons. Wo Fat, played by Khigh Dhiegh, made a NUMBER OF RETURN APPEARANCES, including the 1980 series finale. As the U.S. and China began to normalize diplomatic relations, Wo Fat became an independent menace. In the ninth-season opener, Wo Fat attempts to take over the Chinese government.

George Lazenby in a 1979 episode of Hawaii Five-O

Five-O matched wits with a number of other spies played by the likes of Theodore Bikel (who had tried out for Goldfinger), Maud Adams and Soon Tek-Oh. George Lazenby, the second screen James Bond, played a secondary villain in a 1979 episode filmed on location in Singapore.

Five-O wasn’t always an easy show to work on. Freeman died in early 1974, after the sixth season completed production. Zulu (real name Gilbert Kauhi), who played Kono left after the fourth season; he told fans at the 1996 convention about problems he had with Jack Lord. His replacement, Al Harrington as another detective, departed in the seventh season.

Nevertheless, Five-O had a long run. When it left the air, Five-O was the longest-running crime drama, a status it held until Law and Order, the 1990-2010 series.

Lord’s Steve McGarrett emerged as one of the most recognizable television characters. In 2007, 27 years after the final Five-O episode, THE NEW YORK TIMES’S OPINION PAGES summed up Five-O’s appeal.

“Evil makes McGarrett angry, but when he speaks, his voice is startlingly gentle, exuding a quiet control that a beleaguered generation of parents surely wished they had when facing the forces of social decay,” reads the commentary by Lawrence Downes.

The writer ends his piece describing what it might be like if McGarrett was president. He dispatches Kono and Chin to stop illegal immigration and tells Danny that he wants undocumented workers “legalized. Tell Congress to send me a bill. I want it tough, and I want it fair. And I want it on my desk Monday morning.”

In 2010, CBS introduced a new version of the show, with a slightly different spelling (Hawaii Five-0, with a digit instead of a capital O as in the original), a younger McGarrett (Alex O’Loughlin) and a Danny with more attitude (Scott Caan).

The current series is in its ninth season. For the 50th anniversary of the original show, it will feature a remake of Cocoon, the 1968 pilot. The remake is scheduled to be telecast on Sept. 28.

The 2010s Five-0 has other significant differences than the original. In the eighth season, the McLaughlin and Caan versions of McGarrett and Danny decided to go into the restaurant business on the side. I can’t imagine Leonard Freeman would have approved.

On the other hand, the producers were smart enough . Now, as in 1968, it’s still a highlight.

Advertisements

Rate this:

Like this:

LikeLoading...

Related

Filed under: The Other Spies | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , |

Original Source


Has Wo Fat risen from the grave to exact his greatest revenge…? This sneak peek from Hawaii Five-0‘s Season 9 premiere would sure have you think so!

To mark the CBS franchise’s 50th anniversary, Five-0‘s season opener (airing this Friday, Sept. 28 at 9/8c) serves up a “retelling” of the original Five-O‘s pilot, both titled “Cocoon.” Showrunner Peter M. Lenkov thus shares a writing credit for the episode with the late Leonard Freeman, creator of the series that ran 1968 to 1980.

In the new version, McGarrett (played by Alex O’Loughlin) — after a CIA agent friend is killed — lets himself be captured by the group he thinks is responsible, and in turn endures a torturous sensory deprivation tank to find the killer.

In the sneak peek above, McGarrett is fished out of said tank and scrutinized by his longtime (but dead?) nemesis, Wo Fat (returning guest star Mark Dacascos). Has Steve been deprived of not just sensations but life itself? Press play to find out.

(For the inside story on Wo Fat’s seeming resurrection, check out our First Look at the episode.)

Elsewhere in the premiere, Tani wrestles with whether or not she will tell McGarrett about the murder weapon she found at Adam’s house.

Want more scoop on Five-0, or for any other show? Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and your question may be answered via Matt’s Inside Line.

If you like TVLine, you'll LOVE our weekly newsletter. Click here to subscribe.

Original Source


On the stage, on the screen and on the red carpet. A special moment with Beulah Koale at the 2018 celebration for the new season of Hawaii Five-0.

Advertisements

Like this:

LikeLoading...

Related

Original Source


More than a year after departing Hawaii Five-0, original cast member Grace Park is opening up about her decision to leave the long-running CBS procedural behind after seven seasons.

Back in June 2017, it was announced that both Park and fellow series regular Daniel Dae Kim would not be return for Season 8. At the time, it was reported that they failed to secure pay parity with co-stars Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan — but in a new interview with Entertainment Weekly, Park says that “there were a number of factors spanning the show that affected the non-renewal of my contract.” And while she’s “grateful for the lessons learned,” she says, the choice to leave was ultimately “what was best for my integrity.”

Park doesn’t get into specifics, but rules out one reason for her departure. In the wake of the big announcement last June, Five-0 showrunner Peter M. Lenkov tweeted on Park’s behalf, suggesting that she left Five-0 to spend more time with her family.

“The whole situation was just a bit too charged for me,” she says. “I let him know, ‘That wasn’t cool that you made a statement on my behalf.’ … I know he did it to be helpful, and I care about Peter as a person, but I didn’t leave for that reason.”

To date, only Kim had commented on the situation, saying, “CBS and I weren’t able to agree to terms on a new contract, so I made the difficult choice not to continue.” Park, meanwhile, had remained mum, and even slipped away from a press scrum at the Television Critics Association summer press tour last month.

Lenkov said in July 2017, in the immediate wake of the double departure, “The truth is this: Both actors chose not to extend their contracts. CBS was extremely generous and proactive in their renegotiation talks. So much so, the actors were getting unprecedented raises, but in the end they chose to move on. No one wanted to see them go — they are irreplaceable.”

Park, meanwhile, is returning to primetime this fall as part of the ABC ensemble drama A Million Little Things (premiering Wednesday, Sept. 26, at 10/9c).

If you like TVLine, you'll LOVE our weekly newsletter. Click here to subscribe.

Original Source

JACK LORD - Latest Additions

JACK LORD Highlights

NEW Hawaii Five-0